Ongoing Services

Please remember to report all pregnancies and pregnancy outcomes. The forms are now available to submit online.

Pregnancy Report Form
Pregnancy Outcome Form

For more information regarding the importance of reporting all pregnancies and outcomes, please click Pregnancy Outcome Reporting

We offer the following services for our TSBC families.

Family Contact List
If you conceive a child using TSBC donor sperm, and you're interested in contacting other families who have used the same donor, you have the option of registering with our Family Contact List.To join the list we require that a request be made in writing by letter, email, or filling out the Family Contact List Form on our website.Simply send a written request (attention: Executive Director) that includes your child's full name, date of birth, and donor number. We'll add your name to our family registry, and when there is a match--that is, when another family who used the same donor asks to be put on the list-- we'll put you in contact with each other. Please note that parents must initiate this process themselves, as TSBC does not solicit families to register with the Family Contact List. Please read Family Contact List FAQs

Sibling Inventory
We make every effort to provide inventory to families who wish to have more than one child using the same donor. Sibling inventory is set aside from general inventory and is only available to those women and their partners who have already had a child using the donor. Please let us know your plans as soon as you are pregnant, so we can anticipate sibling inventory needs, and advise you on purchasing vials and storing them with us (storage fees are automatically charged at the time the vials are purchased). The only way to guarantee having vials for future use is to purchase them as soon as possible. Please check out the Current sibling catalog.

Second Parent Adoption Letter
Many lesbian couples who have had children with the assistance of TSBC decide to pursue legal adoption status for the other (non-gestational) mother. As part of this process, you may need to receive a letter from TSBC verifying the purchase of sperm for donor insemination. Courts require this documentation in order to establish that no father will come forward claiming custody. To receive one of these letters, please send us a written request that includes your full name, the full name of your child, the child's date of birth, and donor number. Also, please mention if the letter is to be sent to your attorney as well as yourself. For more information about second parent adoption and other legal strategies for same-sex parents, you may want to contact the National Center for Lesbian Rights at 800-528-NCLR.

Parenting Resources
DI Guide, by Jeff DeGroot at COLAGE, 2010. A comprehensive resource that is written by and for individuals who are donor-conceived. A great resource too for parents, teachers, and medical professionals. Covers many difficult topics such as broaching the topic of your donor with your parents, approaching relationships with others who have the same sperm donor without excluding your own siblings, and more generally dealing with everyday challenges of answering the question 'who's your father?' Beautifully written, easy to read.

If you are a lesbian parent, you may wish to get the American Psychological Association's publication, Lesbian and Gay Parenting . This well-researched document was designed for the use of parents, clinicians, researchers, and lawyers involved in policy and legal issues related to lesbian and gay parenting. See also Scheib and Hastings' review, Lesbian mothers and their donor-conceived children: Family processes, child development and long-term outcomes (2010).

Are you considering being a DI dad? A letter from Walter to would-be DI Dads can help you think through issues related to parenting through donor conception. Written by Walter Merricks, this letter is found among many of the excellent articles at the Donor Connection Network based in the UK.

How to talk with your child. Are you wondering whether to tell your child about his/her donor conception or concerned about how best to discuss this with him/her? Jean Benward, LCSW, provides helpful suggestions in her summary, Discussing Donor Conception with Your Child. For a more detailed discussion, see Talking with Children about Sperm Donation fact sheet also by Jean and co-author Patricia Mendell at the American Fertility Association.

See also
How we became a family by using a sperm donor podcast, Families Ties, and other resources from the Victorian Assisted Reproductive Treatment Authority. VARTA is a great source of information for parents and families.

Telling and Talking: A Guide for Parents by Olivia Montuschi, UK Donor Connection Network. The series of 4 booklets is organized by the age of your child: 0-7 yrs, 8-11 yrs, 12-16 yrs & 17+ yrs. Booklets address whether and how to discuss donor conception with your children.

Additional resources for parents and families are found in our compilation of Recommended Reading.

Also check out Let's Get This Straight: The Ultimate Handbook for Youth with LGBTQ Parents. Let's Get This Straight reaches out to young people with one or more gay, lesbian, bi, or trans parents to provide them with the tools to combat homophobia, take pride in their alternative family structures, and speak out against injustice.